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Can e-learning replace classroom learning ?

STUDY 2

Introduction

A study done by the University of Maryland and the University of Arizona has shown that:

  • E-learning is more effective than traditional classroom learning through a teacher.

In this study, the statistics compiled have affirmed this theory as follows:

Study #1

Traditionnal classes Online classes
Study #1 61.60% 72.53%

Study #2

Traditionnal classes Online classes
Study #2 47.34% 68.28%

In the post-study questionnaires, most students in the online groups reported having enjoyed the multimedia presentation in the virtual classroom and were satisfied with the self-learning learning process. They also felt that sufficient interactivity and flexibility were essential for an online learning environment.

In a traditional classroom, learning is very instructor-oriented and sequential. Although many instructors encourage students to ask questions during lectures, for a variety of reasons, many students do not ask or ask for rehearsals in the classroom, even if they have difficulty understanding lectures. , and they do not have the opportunity to relearn the content of the conference.

In contrast, a virtual environment emphasizes learner-centered activity and interactivity. When a student does not understand a specific concept, he or she can choose a particular content to review until it is fully understood.

Conclusion

Their survey shows that Internet and multimedia technologies are reshaping the way knowledge is provided and that online learning is becoming a real alternative to traditional classroom learning.

The results were consistent: test scores for students who participated in online classroom conferencing were significantly higher than those for students in traditional class groups.

As shown in the table, e-learning groups have significantly outperformed traditional class groups as measured by test scores.

Sources:

  1. Dongsong Zhang (zhangd@umbc.edu) is an assistant professor in the Department of Information Systems, University of Maryland, Baltimore County.
  2. Leon Zhao (lzhao@bpa.arizona.edu) is an associate professor in the Department of Management Information Systems, The University of Arizona, Tucson.
  3. Lina Zhou (zhoul@umbc.edu) is an assistant professor in the Department of Information Systems, University of Maryland, Baltimore County.
  4. Jay F. Nunamaker Jr. (jnunamaker@cmi.arizona.edu) is Regents’ & Soldwedel Professor in the Department of Management Information Systems, The University of Arizona, Tucson.

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